Video 1: Why It's Crucial You Learn to Hunt Now...

...and the single most important tactic you MUST know to fill your freezer to overflowing with waterfowl.

Here's what you'll discover in this video:

  • Food storage may not be enough. Discover why hunting is a crucial skill that should be part of every preppers skillset.
  • Uncover the secret to seeing waterfowl long before they see you coming giving you an unfair advantage for taking this hyper-vigilant game.
  • Learn what it takes to become a proficient hunter in minimum time.

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46 Comments

  • Lon Patterson

    Reply Reply April 17, 2014

    GREAT idea and forethought. This is a BIG gap in “modern” life. I’m looking forward to taking this “journey” with you and learning A-Z about hunting. Thanks and keep up the good work.

    • admin

      Reply Reply April 17, 2014

      Much appreciated Lon!

    • ruby ninja

      Reply Reply April 18, 2014

      Thanks for sharing. We are interested in learning to hunt as well but like you were at first we have never been exposed to it.

  • Donna Staub

    Reply Reply April 17, 2014

    Erich, thank you for taking the time to put this crucial information out there for those of us who would not be able to get this info else where. I have never hunted before as there has never been a need due to supermarket supply but like you I believe that soon there maybe a need. I am very interested in drying and preserving for long term storage. I am hoping you have a lengthy video on it in the future.
    Keep the info coming please.
    Best regards
    Donna

    • admin

      Reply Reply April 17, 2014

      Hi Donna,

      Thanks for the comments. The soon-to-be released course goes into a lot of detail into preservation methods for meat – both on and off-grid.

  • Daniel

    Reply Reply April 17, 2014

    I have been hunting for 15 years or so, mostly big game and I am not a trophy hunter. I hunt for meat to supplement the grocery store food I buy. I have been eating wild game, deer, antelope, and hog exclusively for the last 7 months while I am away from my family going to school. My younger brother and I are not bird hunters and have always been wondering how to field dress a bird, whether it be duck, turkey, even chicken. This first video is very good for someone with absolutely no hunting skills as it pertains to almost any wild game and how you would hunt it.

    • admin

      Reply Reply April 17, 2014

      Hey Daniel,

      The upcoming course has a ton of info on bird processing (plucking, breasting, dressing etc).

  • Jim

    Reply Reply April 17, 2014

    This is vitally important info. Looking forward to learning more.

  • Robert Haight

    Reply Reply April 17, 2014

    Good Intro: Processing the meat and storage will be great follow on vids keep up the good work and thank you.

  • Pat

    Reply Reply April 17, 2014

    What a good idea! I am new to hunting as well and would love to get some tips from someone like Danny. Looking forward to it. Any thoughts on bow hunting?

    • admin

      Reply Reply April 17, 2014

      Almost all of the skills you use in rifle/shotgun hunting apply to bow hunting. Except with bow hunting, your skill needs to be even more refined since you’re taking game at typically closer ranges than with a firearm.

  • Rick

    Reply Reply April 17, 2014

    I believe your videos on hunting is something must ever body needs to know. Hard times are upon us and knowing how to track and kill for food is a need skill. Until your video I never knew you could track waterfowl. Keep up the good work.

    • admin

      Reply Reply April 17, 2014

      Thanks Rick. Before Danny showed me the “ripples” I wouldn’t have thought of it. It’s one of those things that make perfect sense after the fact.

  • John B

    Reply Reply April 17, 2014

    Great video! Thanks for putting this together Eric. I look forward to seeing the others (as well as hearing more about this course you got coming.

  • Anthony K

    Reply Reply April 17, 2014

    I truly enjoyed the first video. It is true that we all need to learn these skills and before we need them. Thank you, look forward to the rest of the. Anthony

    • admin

      Reply Reply April 17, 2014

      You’re right on Anthony. Many think they will “pick up” hunting once things go south. The problem is, so will everyone else. It’s those who know these skills ahead of time that will benefit the most (as well as be able to increase their food stores even before a collapse).

  • Susan Isenberg

    Reply Reply April 17, 2014

    Yea for you Eric, I look forward to this series. For those who haven’t been exposed to hunting and everything involved from start to finish this is a really wonderful project. A need to know skill.

    Susan I.

    • admin

      Reply Reply April 17, 2014

      Thanks so much Susan. Much appreciated!

  • GARY COCHRAN

    Reply Reply April 17, 2014

    Sir,

    I would like to see as many videos on fishing, trapping and hunting. As you know it is possible to trap small and large animals and fish along with hunting and conventional fishing. Preparing and preserving all foods including plants will be extremely useful in a survival situation. Foraging for wild foods is another subject more people should learn. A major problem is we don’t have unlimited time to do all of this. Everywhere we look there are major serious problems developing that could put us in a survival situation in hours, not days or weeks. Please pull out all of the stops and get as much information out ASAP!!!

    Thank you,

    Gary Cochran

    • admin

      Reply Reply April 17, 2014

      Hey Gary,

      Thanks for the great suggestions. While this course is exclusively hunting, Danny and I will be releasing a trapping (not just mammals but fish also) course later this year if there is enough interest. Hunting, fishing, and trapping are a powerful trio.

      – Erich

  • Bud L

    Reply Reply April 17, 2014

    Thanks for the information on birds. I have hunted deer (with little success) and at 84 years old I don’t expect to hunt when walking is necessary, but, I know there are ways to hunt without walking all day. Birds are something I have not thought about hunting. Now I will think more about it. It pays to have someone like you to remind us of things out of our normal thinking.

  • Hello Erich,

    I think you are on target with this idea. A string of video’s on hunting, fishing, and other ways to capture and prepare wild game to harvest for food is wise. Ultimately, we all need to eat and as you noted, even if we have been diligent in our efforts to prepare with food stores circumstances change and it is not unforeseeable that these skills will be just as vital to one’s survival as first aid and wound care.

    A complimentary series gardening and preparing food for storage. i.e. dehydrating, canning, vacuum sealing, might be nice too.

    I look forward to seeing the next video on field dressing animals. You do a real nice job with your web site and reviews. Keep up the great work you’re doing!

    Remain safe out there…

    Christopher
    aka MrKyp

  • Tai

    Reply Reply April 17, 2014

    Erich,

    You must of been reading my mind. I live in NYC and granted we deal more with survival than hunting, I was talking about this with a coworker on how we don’t know how to hunt or dress or prepare our hunt to supplement our food supply. Where would we go to learn the basics of these skills and who would teach us now. I am so looking forward to this course.

    Tai
    Semper Fi

  • RAY

    Reply Reply April 17, 2014

    As all of the seasoned/life long hunters know,,,IS,, out there are going to be people who have never hunted or used a firearm..and the fact that will hunt around the areas they know and shoot at anything that moves,,that said,,,always remember SAFETY 1st.,,keep your hunting area to your self,,do not brag your game taken,,~~~~TO Tai;; I’m from the South and got my BB gun at age 5,,a 22 at 6,,just like all the other guy’s from my area,,there are a lot of good book’s and hunting TV show’s out there,,BUT the best way is to start camping,,find a GOOD firearms instructor,,check with your state park rangers or game warden about hunter education classes,,down here they are offered every year,,I don’t about your state..DO NOT but cheap firearm’s,,get name brands,,a good 30-30 will work great on deer size game,,a good 22 or a shotgun for small game,,,

  • CW

    Reply Reply April 17, 2014

    Good intro, look forward to see what else you have.

  • Saddle Hunter

    Reply Reply April 17, 2014

    I can relate to everything you are trying to inform the public about, being a prepper myself. Most all my experiences started when I was about 8 yrs. old, I came from a very bad back ground. I’ve been on my own since about 8, it was either learn the ways of the wild or become a ward of the state. I chose to learn the wild and avoid all of the legal contacts, ( so to speak ). Over my 56 yrs of life I’ve managed to learn quite a bit about the whens, wheres, & how to’s of what most animals will do or respond to when the human factor comes into play. I come from Louisiana, and believe you me life in the swamp is not easy. It did prepare me for when I joined the army, while most people where hungry I never went without. All animals are basically the same no matter what part of the world you are in.
    Most people are unwilling to eat some animals because they don’t know what they or it is. If and when you decide to shut your mouth and open your eyes & ears you can learn a lot about your surroundings. I use techniques that have been around for generations, both white man & the American Indian. If you think about it, How did the Indians survive for so long before the white man came ? They had to have ways to hunt for a whole village and then preserve it for a very long time. Some books are okay, but to really learn ask the people who have done it. As the old saying goes , You need to walk that mile in their footsteps to really learn. Not to say where my site is, more than half my fall out shelter is under ground. Kinda like a hobbit home, the rest is covered with sod and grass. My actual bunker and root-cellar are 22′ under the surface, special ways in & out. The temp inside never gets above 48 in my root-cellar. It has a clay back ground with a rubber coating 12″ sq.timbers x 24′ L x 16′ H timber construction to seal out all moister. No light reaches any of my food storage. Most of my large pieces of meat are salt cured and others dried then vacuum sealed, I’ve had canned items in there for more than 7 yrs. I constantly rotate from old to new, when I’m staying there. All things are done by hunting or fishing. But in this ” Me first world ” ,it’s hard to get most people to understand this way of life especially the newer techno generation.
    This is just part of one old gessers way to make it for little while longer when SHTF. The one thing that most folks forget is that if the Good Lord wants you, you can’t hide. No matter where your staying. If it’s just man and bad environment – well good luck to them. Well that’s enough ranting, I just hope more people will learn to listen to the older folks, we’re not as crazy as they might think. God Bless you and yours — Keep up the good work.
    Signing off

    Saddle Hunter

  • Dennis Perkins

    Reply Reply April 17, 2014

    Thanks so much and looking forward to your additional videos. Grew up on a farm so we raised everything we ate. In Texas I want to learn how to hunt hogs and then field dress them on the spot. Lost of meat there and good to boot. I understand they are a pretty cagey animal so should be interesting. Thanks for all your info. I already vacuum pack and dry food so I’m ready to learn how to hunt

  • Don

    Reply Reply April 17, 2014

    Hey,
    Just wanted to say I really enjoyed the video and coming from Minnesota I have enjoyed hunting as a child. I enjoyed the tip about the waves for the ducks in the video. Keep them coming.

  • Tony York

    Reply Reply April 17, 2014

    Here in the midsouth there has always been a very strong hunting and fishing culture. My grandparents all supported their families during the depression and then ww11 by farming, bartering, and what game or fish they could take. Large families with many mouths to feed. My point is this. It was crucial for survival to have those skills and to pass them on thru the family. I am now 53 and start takeing my sons hunting and fishing at an early age.Most depend way to much on the grocery store or the government tit these days and it will be very bad for those who don’t have the ability to provide for them selfs . Get a bow , 22 rifle , 12 gauge shotgun and a fishing pole. Learn to use them and teach your family as well. Eric , thank you for all of the time and thought you put into each series . Folks, you don’t have to be a prepper to know that this is important . Be safe all.

  • mugen

    Reply Reply April 17, 2014

    This is what I needed to be more selfreliant, thank you for uploading the video and I’ll keep on watching them.

  • Susie

    Reply Reply April 18, 2014

    Danny is so fast and smooth! Don’t hunt (yet) but you’re right “on target” with this series. Thanks!

  • Mike

    Reply Reply April 18, 2014

    Been hunting for years. Still I can never ever get enough of other peoples information and knowledge. Looking forward to future videos. Thank you and keep them coming. Getting excited about it

  • Brian

    Reply Reply April 18, 2014

    Been looking forward to learning how to hunts since I have taken up archery. This looks very promising. I really enjoy the approach you are taking on this. Great job! Can’t wait for more.

  • Denise

    Reply Reply April 18, 2014

    How do you overcome the aversion to killing anything?

    • Erich

      Reply Reply April 18, 2014

      Hi Denise,

      Very good question. It really comes down to shifting your mindset. Keep in mind that something has to die in order for something else to live. This is a natural law that encompasses the smallest microorganism to the largest mammal and we as humans cannot escape that. Plants live off of the sun, water and decomposing organisms that were once alive. Herbivores live off of plants that had to “die” in order for them to live and we too live off of plants (and animals) which have to “die” in order for us to continue. It’s the circle of life and I think hunting more than anything else truly helps you appreciate just how much we too are included in that circle. For me, this understanding has helped me overcome that aversion.

      • Denise

        Reply Reply April 22, 2014

        I really appreciate everyone who responded. I do know it is the circle of life and the balance of nature. Doyle you said it beautifully. I would really like to raise rabbits and chickens to help provide for our family, but I don’t think it is fair to expect my husband to kill (he does not enjoy it either) and process them while I just wait in the kitchen for the meat to arrive. I love my animals. Is there a way to dispatch them that will reduce stress on me and pain on the animal? Doyle your advise about thanking God is well said. Whenever I harvest plants or herbs, I always express appreciation to God and to the plant for sharing its life energy with me. Expressing gratitude helps keep these things in balance. I guess part of my problem right now is that I don’t NEED to kill animals to exist, and yet, if I fail to learn these skills while I can, when I do need them, the time of preparation will be past. Everyone, thank you of being respectful of my concern. I hesitated to post my comment as I feared I would be ridiculed.

    • Doyle

      Reply Reply April 18, 2014

      Congratulations! You are a member of the human race. Very few people or even animals kill just to be killing. Most people take animals for food, population control, or acts of mercy. If you or your family were hungry or starving would you kill an animal to feed them? If you were shown an extremely large herd of animals that were starving from eating most of their food crop from their habitat could you help destroy part of that herd in order for the rest of the herds survival? If you came upon an animal that had been severely injured and was dying a slow agonizing death, would you put that animal out of its misery? Most people would say yes to any of these situations. You must put aside your aversion and do what should be done. I will not tell you that it is always easy to do. Ranchers, farmers, hunters, fishermen, survivalists, preppers, and even gardeners, regularly take the lives of animals, fish and plants. Each have different reasons and each finds a way to overcome their aversion to killing. Dying is a fact of life, all living things do it sooner or later. It never hurts to stop a moment and thank the animal, fish, plant, and especially God, for the life that you take, for whatever reason you take it.

      • Prepper 1967

        Reply Reply April 20, 2014

        Well said, Doyle!

    • KBH

      Reply Reply April 20, 2014

      Hey Denise, I found that knowing that you will be using that animal or plant (they die too) for the livelihood of yourself and your family helps alot. Since I also process the fish or mammals from the field all the way to the table, and take care to ensure that the most is used from each (like boiling the bones for stew/stock) that this leads to a sense that there was no “loss” of the animal due to it’s demise. Very little is wasted – unlike commercial meat and fish processing. Add to that there is a feeling of carrying on an eons old tradition of mankind. Hope this helps.

  • Bill Dover

    Reply Reply April 18, 2014

    Right on track. processing and storage are the areas that I am most interested in. Thanks for the series

  • jerry

    Reply Reply April 19, 2014

    Looking forward to learning all I don not know. Thanks.

  • Silvia Villareal

    Reply Reply April 19, 2014

    Hey I am glad to see how to hunt ducks it is not easy. I have been hunting for 20 years I am a mother of two and my children have been hunting since they were nine and seven. My husband has always says if you kill it you clean it. So we all know how to dress it. Which is not my thing to do! I like living off the land. I have been for years telling friends and family about learn to do things for themselves and not to depend on other people to give they what they need. Every year I try to learn a new project from made bread to sewing to canning. I think we have be come to depend to much on convenience.

  • Prepper 1979

    Reply Reply April 19, 2014

    The intro video is well done. There is the typo “by” in the 3 leader statements – “never be paralyzed by overwhelm again”. Looking forward to more!

  • Prepper 1967

    Reply Reply April 20, 2014

    I am so enthused about what videos you have forthcoming. I was raised in a small town in the Unita Basin, by my grandmother and grandfather. I am 46 and haven’t been hunting since my grandfather’s death in the 80’s. Although, I remember a few of his lessons and skills in which he taught. A lot of them are gone.
    I believe within my heart that these videos will be a significant lesson of skills in which we will learn greatly.
    However, I see a slight problem with the insight of these skills no matter how great they are. That problem being; an extermination of said animals by an over population of hunters.

  • speer

    Reply Reply April 20, 2014

    Erich… well done and …. about time someone taught some of us how to survive… really survive off the land when the canned beans run out. Looking forward to each installment. I’ve never hunted, not game anyway, my skill set lies in another direction and like you, I have no doubt much of my game would go to waste. At least now I understand where the ‘good’ cuts of meat are on a deer and how to harvest it. John

  • lewis conley

    Reply Reply April 23, 2015

    my dad shoed me how to hant and trap we lived that wa
    y in the past thanks i loved it

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